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ACP 2001 ACHIEVEMENTS

 

Post-September 11th

  • Prevented Rollback On Encryption: Reached out to historic champions in Congress and enlisted their help; lobbied key Members of Congress (friendly and unfriendly); prevented any provision on encryption from being included in the anti-terrorism legislation; worked to keep a mandatory key escrow proposal by Senator Gregg out of appropriation bills; ensured no such proposals were floated or advanced in the House; educated Congress concerning steganography.


  • Prevented Anti-Terrorism Legislation From Imposing Technical Mandates: Included a provision stating that the Act does not impose any additional technical obligation and requiring reasonable compensation for furnishing assistance; limited the application of pen register and trap & trace orders to e-mails and Web-surfing to be equivalent to interception of telephone communications (i.e., no interception of content).


  • Supported Funding To Improve The Government's Level Of Cybersecurity And Ability To Combat Cybercrime: Supported DOD, DOJ, and DOC funding to improve the government's own computer systems and to provide better training and equipment for preventing, investigating, and prosecuting cybercrime.


  • Pushed For Congressional Passage Of Information-Sharing Bill: Lobbied for expeditious action on legislation to provide FOIA, antitrust, and use protections for private-sector cybersecurity information shared with the government (Davis/Moran and Bennett); explored inclusion of such provisions in homeland security legislation.


  • Monitored Administration Initiatives On Cybersecurity: Tracked Executive Branch organizational changes and policy initiatives including the proposed Govnet system.

Pre-September 11th

  • Prevented Inclusion Of Date Retention Proposals And Technological Mandates In The Council of Europe Cybercrime Treaty: Working through DOJ, defeated proposals for the treaty to require data retention and to mandate that the private sector develop and deploy new real-time interception capabilities.


  • Ensured That U.S. Policy Toward International Cybersecurity Initiatives Complied With ACP Principles. Tracked EU, OECD, APEC, G8, and UN cybersecurity initiatives; intervened with USG to ensure that US response to the EU Proposal for Network and Information Security comported with ACP principles.


  • Improved Legislation Promoting Cybersecurity Information-Sharing: Worked with Representatives Davis and Moran to improve their bill and participated in July press conference reintroducing the bill (H.R. 2435); worked extensively with Senator Bennett on his version of an information sharing bill supported introduction of S. 1456.


  • Educated The New 107th Congress About ACP's Principles: Sent letter to the new 107th Congress setting forth ACP's positions on encryption and critical information infrastructure protection; educated policymakers that the primary threat to privacy is from the government, not the private sector; held several "lobby days" meeting with House and Senate Members.


  • Educated The New Bush Administration And Tracked Administration Initiatives: Sent letter to President-elect Bush setting forth ACP's principles; communicated ACP principles to key Administration policymakers in the White House, Vice President's Office, NEC, DPC, DOD, DOJ, and DOC; worked to ensure the continuation of the NIAC; participated in DOJ and DOC meetings with the private sector concerning cybersecurity.



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